Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Coif, 3 piece

TitleCoif, 3 piece
Entry #GGC2021.004
Alternate NamesCoif  
Year1000-1600 CE
Time range1000-1600 CE
EraHigh Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesGermany, Western European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Head covering made from small scraps of linen fabric.                  

Description:

It’s underwear for your head.  Many images of the middle ages feature people wearing coifs to cover and protect their hair, oils from their head from their hats and for something to connect hats to.  They also are an easy accessory to add to your

These are very simple to construct either by machine or by hand and take very little fabric.  They are easily made from cotton fabric or linen and there are surviving examples and images that show a number of variations through time or cultures.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

Accessories

Source/Links

Illustration from Cantigas de Santa Maria manuscript. The Cantigas de Santa Maria (Songs to the Virgin Mary) are manuscripts written in Galician-Portuguese, with music notation, during the reign of Alfonso X El Sabio (1221-1284).

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Library
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Full Entry, Male

1000 CE Norman Riding Tunic 2

Title: 1000 CE Norman Riding Tunic 2
Entry #: GGB2021.028
Alternate Names: tunic, t tunic 
Year: 1000
Time range: 900-1200 CE
Era: Early Medieval
Gender: Male
region: Western Europe
Countries/cultures: England France
Maker: Vincent De Vere, Kristine Nic Tallier
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image example

Intro:

A version of the basic tunic used in many European cultures from antiquity through to the high middle ages by some.  This tunic is split to allow wearer to ride a horse and have freedom of movement.

Description:

One of the many variations of the tunics made out of linen or wool. This example has a keyhole neck opening and featuring a split in front and back bottom to allow the wearer to ride a horse. 

This variation was cut T tunic style out of a wide piece of fabric to minimize seams. A more period cut would include seams connecting the sleeve to the body.  Trim is an applique of linen.  Keyhole neck is held closed with a brooch pin.  Tunics are about the easiest garments to construct.

Tunics are often the starting point for new members when just beginning in the SCA.  This tunic could be made for less than $20 in 2021.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • wool
    • linen (including non-flax linen)
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool blends,
    • Linen, linen/rayon
    • linen/cotton
    • some cottons could be used but cotton broad cloth is not advised as it is not a strong material and doesn’t drape well
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Under shirt (likely of a similar cut)
  • Belt
  • Pouch

New members often start with just a tunic and belt.

  • pants/trews/braccae
  • leg wraps
  • turn shoes/boots

Accessories

  • under tunic as bottom layer
  • belt
  • pants
  • over tunic or super tunic over the tunic
  • shoes
  • cloak or coat

Source/Links

http://www.virtue.to/articles/tunic_worksheet.html

http://alianorderavenglas.wordpress.com/as-50-challenge/13th-century-riding-tunic/

Version: 2
date: 3/1/2021
Source of Period Pic: Maciejowski Bible.
Model: Vincent De Vere
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

1000 CE Norman Riding Tunic 1

Title: 1000 CE Norman Riding Tunic 1
Entry #: GGB2021.027
Alternate Names: tunic, t tunic 
Year: 1000
Time range: 900-1200 CE
Era: Early Medieval
Gender: Male
region: Western Europe
Countries/cultures: England France
Maker: Vincent De Vere
Difficulty: 1
Confidence: Image example

Intro:

A version of the basic tunic used in many European cultures from antiquity through to the high middle ages by some.  This tunic is split to allow wearer to ride a horse and have freedom of movement.

Description:

One of the many variations of the tunics made out of linen or wool. This example has a keyhole neck opening and featuring a split in front and back bottom to allow the wearer to ride a horse. 

This variation was cut T tunic style out of a wide piece of fabric to minimize seams. A more period cut would include seams connecting the sleeve to the body.  Trim is an applique of linen.  Keyhole neck is held closed with a brooch pin.  Tunics are about the easiest garments to construct.

Tunics are often the starting point for new members when just beginning in the SCA.  This tunic could be made for less than $20 in 2021.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • wool
    • linen (including non-flax linen)
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool blends,
    • Linen, linen/rayon
    • linen/cotton
    • some cottons could be used but cotton broad cloth is not advised as it is not a strong material and doesn’t drape well
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Under shirt (likely of a similar cut)
  • Belt
  • Pouch

New members often start with just a tunic and belt.

  • pants/trews/braccae
  • leg wraps
  • turn shoes/boots

Accessories

  • under tunic as bottom layer
  • belt
  • pants
  • over tunic or super tunic over the tunic
  • shoes
  • cloak or coat

Source/Links

http://www.virtue.to/articles/tunic_worksheet.html

http://alianorderavenglas.wordpress.com/as-50-challenge/13th-century-riding-tunic/

Version: 2
date: 3/1/2021
Source of Period Pic: Maciejowski Bible.
Model: Vincent De Vere
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1000 CE Female Anglo Saxon Tunic Dress

Title1000 CE Female Anglo Saxon Tunic Dress
Entry #GGB2021.015
Alternate Names Tunic dress, gown,
Year1000 CE
Time range900-1066 CE
EraEarly Medieval
Genderfemale
regionWestern Europe
Countries/culturesAnglo Saxon, England
MakerBeocca the Fair of Hastings
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

A tunic dress style outfit with accessories common to many early or pre medieval cultures. Under dress in the tunic style, and a decorated over dress.

Description:

Few representations survive of early garments and many fewer extant examples, however what does survive would support much of what is shown here. 

The basic tunic style dress consisting of a linen under dress and a wool over dress featuring embroidered decoration around the neck.  Worn with a wimple minus the veil (not pictured) on the head. 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Linen for Under Layers
    • Wool for outer Layer
    • Linen or silk for the wimple and veil
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Some cottons
    • cotton/linen blends
    • linen/rayon blends
    • some wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Under Dress
  • Over Tunic

  • Wimple and Veil

Accessories

Source/Links

Version2
date3/5/2021
Source of Period PicThe National Portrait Gallery History of the Kings and Queens of England by David Williamson, ISBN 1855142287.
ModelDiana Hastings 020213-22 091413-06
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1000 CE Female Norman Gown 3

Title: 1000 CE Female Norman Gown 3
Entry #: GGB2021.019
Alternate Names: Gown, Cotte, tunic dress 
Year: 1100 CE
Time range: 900-1150CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western Europe
Countries/cultures: Norman, Anglo Saxon, England, france
Maker: Sorcha O’Riain
Difficulty: 1
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

A common tunic dress style garment prevalent both in England as well as central Europe for the time leading up to and after the Norman invasion of 1066 CE

Description:

A common style worn by women in pre and post Norman invasion in England as well as France consisted of a tunic style underdress and over dress.

The underdress called a chemise, chainse or smock would commonly be made of linen. 

The over tunic or cotte would be longer for higher status women or shorter for working class. Sleeves are shown in some painting both tight to the wrist as well as bell or trumpet sleeves. Commonly made out of wool and perhaps decorated with embroidery or the applique of contrasting fabrics.

Commonly work with this would be simple turn or bag shoes, and a head covering such as a wimple and veil. 

This dress is constructed as a tunic style dress,  A blue bell-sleeved over dress, or gown, worn over a green and white underdress, with a chemise under that.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Underdress – Linen, including non-flax linens
    • Overdress – Wool
    • Wimple/veil – Linen or silk for high status women
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Underdress – linen, linen blends, cottons
    • Overdresses – Wool blends, linens, linen blends, some heaver cottons
    • Wimple/Veil – linen, silk, poly (watch out for candles!)
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Underdress – below the knee, long sleeved, white or off white light fabrics
  • Overdress

  • Headwear
  • Shoes

Accessories

  • Belt
  • Pouch
  • Bag

Source/Links

Version: 2
date: 3/5/2021
Source of Period Pic: Figure of Grammatica, from the Hortus Deliciarum – 12th century
Model: Sorcha O’Riain
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1000 CE Female Norman Gown 2

Title: 1000 CE Female Norman Gown 2
Entry #: GGB2021.018
Alternate Names: Gown, Cotte, tunic dress 
Year: 1100 CE
Time range: 900-1150CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western Europe
Countries/cultures: Norman, Anglo Saxon, England, france
Maker: Christine Misterka
Difficulty: 1
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

A common tunic dress style garment prevalent both in England as well as central Europe for the time leading up to and after the Norman invasion of 1066 CE

Description:

A common style worn by women in pre and post Norman invasion in England as well as France consisted of a tunic style underdress and over dress.

The underdress called a chemise, chainse or smock would commonly be made of linen. 

The over tunic or cotte would be longer for higher status women or shorter for working class. Sleeves are shown in some painting both tight to the wrist as well as bell or trumpet sleeves. Commonly made out of wool and perhaps decorated with embroidery or the applique of contrasting fabrics.

Commonly work with this would be simple turn or bag shoes, and a head covering such as a wimple and veil. 

This dress is constructed as a tunic style dress,  A blue bell-sleeved over dress, or gown, worn over a green and white underdress, with a chemise under that.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Underdress – Linen, including non-flax linens
    • Overdress – Wool
    • Wimple/veil – Linen or silk for high status women
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Underdress – linen, linen blends, cottons
    • Overdresses – Wool blends, linens, linen blends, some heaver cottons
    • Wimple/Veil – linen, silk, poly (watch out for candles!)
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Underdress – below the knee, long sleeved, white or off white light fabrics
  • Overdress

  • Headwear
  • Shoes

Accessories

  • Belt
  • Pouch
  • Bag

Source/Links

Version: 2
date: 3/5/2021
Source of Period Pic: Figure of Grammatica, from the Hortus Deliciarum – 12th century
Model: Christine Misterka
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1000 CE Female Norman Gown 1

Title: 1000 CE Female Norman Gown 1
Entry #: GGB2021.017
Alternate Names: Gown, Cotte, tunic dress 
Year: 1100 CE
Time range: 900-1150CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western Europe
Countries/cultures: Norman, Anglo Saxon, England, france
Maker: Hanne Abendschein
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

A common tunic dress style garment prevalent both in England as well as central Europe for the time leading up to and after the Norman invasion of 1066 CE

Description:

A common style worn by women in pre and post Norman invasion in England as well as France consisted of a tunic style underdress and over dress.

The underdress called a chemise, chainse or smock would commonly be made of linen. 

The over tunic or cotte would be longer for higher status women or shorter for working class. Sleeves are shown in some painting both tight to the wrist as well as bell or trumpet sleeves. Commonly made out of wool and perhaps decorated with embroidery or the applique of contrasting fabrics.

Commonly work with this would be simple turn or bag shoes, and a head covering such as a wimple and veil. 

This dress is constructed as a tunic style dress,  A blue bell-sleeved over dress, or gown, worn over a green and white underdress, with a chemise under that.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Underdress – Linen, including non-flax linens
    • Overdress – Wool
    • Wimple/veil – Linen or silk for high status women
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Underdress – linen, linen blends, cottons
    • Overdresses – Wool blends, linens, linen blends, some heaver cottons
    • Wimple/Veil – linen, silk, poly (watch out for candles!)
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Underdress – below the knee, long sleeved, white or off white light fabrics
  • Overdress

  • Headwear
  • Shoes

Accessories

  • Belt
  • Pouch
  • Bag

Source/Links

Version: 2
date: 3/5/2021
Source of Period Pic: Figure of Grammatica, from the Hortus Deliciarum – 12th century
Model: Hanne Abendschein
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1150 CE Female Bliaut Inspired Fantasy Dress 3

Title: 1150 CE Female Bliaut Inspired Fantasy Dress 3
Entry #: GGB2021.035
Alternate Names: Buttercup’s Dress from Princess Bride 
Year: 1150 CE
Time range: 1150-1250’s CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Female
region: Europe
Countries/cultures: Europe, france, england
Maker: Vincent De Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Fantasy based on historic garment

Intro:

Buttercup’s riding Dress from the first part of the Princess Bride.  This movie costume is very similar to a Bliaut.

Women’s or men’s over-garment characterized by the tunic like construction with side closures resulting in a more fitted silhouette.  The attached skirts were full and floor length for women and shorter for men and the sleeves were commonly fitted above the elbow and trumpet shaped or widened out below the elbow.

Description:

Although similar to the basic t tunic dress the differences in the sleeves and the under-bust to waist area distinguish them.  The sleeves vary in style, but predominantly are characterized by the fitted upper sleeve and the widened lower sleeve.  The lower sleeve by be in the form of a trumpet sleeve or as extreme as examples that drag the floor.  A lined sleeve that could be turned back to expose an expensive inner liner would also be seen. 

The other major distinguishing feature is the under-bust puckering of the fabric.  There remains multiple ways to achieve this look, but many have had success by elongating the under-bust to waist dress length by some number of inches and by adding lacing on the side of the dress to achieve the fitted look. Most evidence of the dress is found in areas of French fashion influence.

An Attempt of Buttercup’s dress.  Much like a Bliaut but the sleeve had cuffs that were an adaptation for the movie.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Some think images of fine pleats to represent silks
    • fine wools
    • rich fabrics
    • perhaps linen
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
    • muslin for undergarments
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Underdress
  • Bliaut overdress

  • various head coverings

Accessories

  • a belt wrapped around the body
  • pouch or purse
  • wimple or veiled head covering

Source/Links

https://www.eg.bucknell.edu/~lwittie/sca/garb/bliaut.html

http://danikaulakisart.com/bliaut.pdf

https://adamselindisdress.blog/2014/04/28/12th-century-dress-the-bliaut/

Version: 3
date: 3/6/2021
Source of Period Pic: Chartres cathedral ,Angers cathedral, France, sculpture at West Portal (detail of existing Commons image :Image:Angers Cathedral sculpture at west door TTaylor.jpg
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1150 CE Female Bliaut 4

Title: 1150 CE Female Bliaut 4
Entry #: GGB2021.036
Alternate Names:  
Year: 1150 CE
Time range: 1150-1250’s CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Female
region: Europe
Countries/cultures: Europe, france, england
Maker: Vincent De Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

Women’s or men’s over-garment characterized by the tunic like construction with side closures resulting in a more fitted silhouette.  The attached skirts were full and floor length for women and shorter for men and the sleeves were commonly fitted above the elbow and trumpet shaped or widened out below the elbow.

Description:

Although similar to the basic t tunic dress the differences in the sleeves and the under-bust to waist area distinguish them.  The sleeves vary in style, but predominantly are characterized by the fitted upper sleeve and the widened lower sleeve.  The lower sleeve by be in the form of a trumpet sleeve or as extreme as examples that drag the floor.  A lined sleeve that could be turned back to expose an expensive inner liner would also be seen. 

The other major distinguishing feature is the under-bust puckering of the fabric.  There remains multiple ways to achieve this look, but many have had success by elongating the under-bust to waist dress length by some number of inches and by adding lacing on the side of the dress to achieve the fitted look. Most evidence of the dress is found in areas of French fashion influence.

This bliaut is purple linen with gold silk around the collar as well as lining the sleeves. 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Some think images of fine pleats to represent silks
    • fine wools
    • rich fabrics
    • perhaps linen
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
    • muslin for undergarments
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Underdress
  • Bliaut overdress

  • various head coverings

Accessories

  • a belt wrapped around the body
  • pouch or purse
  • wimple or veiled head covering

Source/Links

https://www.eg.bucknell.edu/~lwittie/sca/garb/bliaut.html

http://danikaulakisart.com/bliaut.pdf

https://adamselindisdress.blog/2014/04/28/12th-century-dress-the-bliaut/

Version: 3
date: 3/6/2021
Source of Period Pic: Chartres cathedral ,Angers cathedral, France, sculpture at West Portal , Sculptures on the exterior of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Chartres
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1150 CE Female Bliaut 2

Title: 1150 CE Female Bliaut 2
Entry #: GGB2021.034
Alternate Names:  
Year: 1150 CE
Time range: 1150-1250’s CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Female
region: Europe
Countries/cultures: Europe, france, england
Maker: Vincent De Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

Women’s or men’s over-garment characterized by the tunic like construction with side closures resulting in a more fitted silhouette.  The attached skirts were full and floor length for women and shorter for men and the sleeves were commonly fitted above the elbow and trumpet shaped or widened out below the elbow.

Description:

Although similar to the basic t tunic dress the differences in the sleeves and the under-bust to waist area distinguish them.  The sleeves vary in style, but predominantly are characterized by the fitted upper sleeve and the widened lower sleeve.  The lower sleeve by be in the form of a trumpet sleeve or as extreme as examples that drag the floor.  A lined sleeve that could be turned back to expose an expensive inner liner would also be seen. 

The other major distinguishing feature is the under-bust puckering of the fabric.  There remains multiple ways to achieve this look, but many have had success by elongating the under-bust to waist dress length by some number of inches and by adding lacing on the side of the dress to achieve the fitted look. Most evidence of the dress is found in areas of French fashion influence.

This is a simplified bliaut made from blue linen blend fabric constructed in a simplified way.  It lacks decoration or lining but is a very simple to construct garment

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Some think images of fine pleats to represent silks
    • fine wools
    • rich fabrics
    • perhaps linen
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
    • muslin for undergarments
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Underdress
  • Bliaut overdress

  • various head coverings

Accessories

  • a belt wrapped around the body
  • pouch or purse
  • wimple or veiled head covering

Source/Links

https://www.eg.bucknell.edu/~lwittie/sca/garb/bliaut.html

http://danikaulakisart.com/bliaut.pdf

https://adamselindisdress.blog/2014/04/28/12th-century-dress-the-bliaut/

Version: 2
date: 3/6/2021
Source of Period Pic: Chartres cathedral ,Angers cathedral, France, sculpture at West Portal , Sculptures on the exterior of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Chartres
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere