Advanced Entry, C3 Entry, Female

900 CE Jorvic York Hangeroc Ensemble 2

Title: 900 CE Jorvic York Hangeroc Ensemble 2
Entry #: GGA2021.009
Alternate Names: Apron Dress 
Year: 900
Time range: 900-1000CE
Era: Early Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western European
Countries/cultures: Norse, Viking, England
Maker: Æsa Helgulfsdottir
From: Barony of Endless Hills, Æthelmearc
Difficulty: 5
Confidence: Speculative Reconstruction

These entries are taken from the participants in the Calontir Clothing Challenge (C3) which ran from 10/1/2020-1/31/2021. The C3 challenged artisans to make a 4-layer outfit over a four month period, three of which were clothing layers and the fourth an “accessory” (widely defined to include anything that displayed a non-sewing skill), while documenting their work. Entrants ranged from beginners making their first outfits to experienced members.

Because of how these were received, they will be in a different format to other entries.

Intro:

About Æsa: I’ve been in the SCA for about 13 years. While I love sewing, I also enjoy playing with other skills like archery, knife and axe throwing, fiber arts, basket weaving, herbalism, soap making, pottery and brewing/cooking. I love acquiring skills that a Viking wife would have used in her everyday life. While the sewing aspects of the garments will not be difficult, historical clothing can sometimes present challenges as I am paralyzed. I often have to strike a balance between something that looks as correct as possible while also being comfortable, allowing for medical restrictions and not hindering my wheelchair’s movement.

Description:

I’m hoping to create an ensemble that would have been worn by the Norse wife of a fairly well-off land owner in 10th century Jorvik. The piece is not based on any single burial find, but takes inspiration from several. The plan is for wool stockings, a linen underdress, a woolen dress and apron with jewelry and a head covering. The goal is to spin and weave a component of the ensemble.

I’m very happy with my final project! When I started the dress concept in October, I was trying to envision what would look good photographed in a bleak January landscape (Pennsylvania can be pretty dreary this time of year!). I had many moments during the challenge where I questioned the decision to leave my designs simple and the colors natural, but in the end I’m very happy that I stuck to my original plan. It turned out exactly as I wanted it to.

C3 Level:

Historically Focused/Advanced

Complete Outfit Images:

Layer 1

seams and tacked them down using a running stitch and matching threads. For my stockings, I struggled a little deciding what to make. Many of the current interpretations from archeological finds seem to have a seam running along the sole of the foot, which I was afraid would be very irritating as I have some nerve issues from the paralysis. I also knew that I wanted the stockings to end below the knee, as I didn’t want to have any fabric bunched behind the knee as my legs are always bent. In the end, I used a pattern that I had drafted about ten years ago from “The Medieval Tailor’s Assistant” as I knew that it was comfortable to wear. The stockings were made from brown wool flannel, hand sewn and the seams were tacked down using a running stitch in contrasting thread.

Layer 2

The second layer is a simple gown made of Shetland wool in a diamond twill. It’s a dress style and pattern that I’ve used many times before, so no issues! All the seams are handsewn and raw edges enclosed.

Layer 3

My third layer is an apron dress. The fabric was hand woven from yarn that I spun in my fiber mill. The center panel is dyed using walnut hulls. The dress is a simple tube construction with a little gathering in the front. I think that the tube style might be an issue if I was walking, but in the wheelchair it gathers the underdresses in and keeps them away from the tires very nicely! I had originally wanted to bind the top edge with more of the walnut dyed fabric, but it ended up being too bulky so I used the same wool as my stockings instead. I really liked the look of the felted fringe at the edge of the weaving, so I left it as the bottom of my dress.

The seams are handsewn; however, the fabric is a very loose weave and I did have trouble keeping the seams from unraveling. The fabric is thick enough that bound seams were becoming very bulky. Because getting dressed in the wheelchair can require a lot of tugging fabric into place, I reinforced a few of the seams on my sewing machine. This is the only machine sewing in the entire project.

Layer 4

My judged accessory is a willow and oak basket. The most explanation that I could find on viking baskets that were not the Gokstad backpack was the following reference “Round and square basket bases were found in the Scandinavian settlement in York, England, then known as “Jorvik.” The bases have holes around the perimeter, indicating that sticks or reeds may have been seated there, serving as the vertical staves to support the horizontally-woven bands.”

My husband cut and drilled the oak base for me, as the majority of our woodworking tools are in the basement which is not wheelchair accessible. I soaked the willow for a week and then wove the basket using a 3 rod wale for the bottom and top edges and a single plain weave for the body. I’ve made baskets before, but this was my first willow basket and my first with a solid base.

Additional accessories include:

A handwoven shawl from Shetland wool. I spun the yarn in my fiber mill.

A headscarf of linen, lightly dyed with walnut.

A Jorvik cap, handsewn from linen I wove on a ground loom many Pennsics ago.

A leather knife sheath with sterling silver embellishments.

A necklace of carnelian and crystal quartz with bronze additions.

Version:1.0
date: 1/2/2022
Source of Period Pic:
Model: Æsa Helgulfsdottir
Photographer: Æsa Helgulfsdottir
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Pants, Basic 2 Piece with feet

TitlePants, Basic 2 Piece with feet
Entry #GGC2021.005
Alternate NamesTrews, PJ pants,   
YearAntiquity-end of period
Time rangeAntiquity-end of period
Eraall
Genderunisex
regionall
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceTheorized Reconstruction

Intro:

Simplified version of pants worn in many cultures and times periods from antiquity to the end of the SCA period         

Description:

One of the many variations of the pants seen in imagery from antiquity through to the end of the SCA period.   There are many works of art that do represent people in a variety of pants.  The garments can be documented and construction can be inferred in a variety of forms.  Many examples of surviving extant fragments were of wool.

Variations in pants include how baggy the garments are, how long they are, how wide the waistline is and how the waist is cinched closed.

This example is for ‘pajama pants’ style pants with enclosed feet.  Constructed from a medium cotton material with a drawstring closure for the waist.  The pants are made in 2 parts with the seams sewn up the inside of either leg and then the legs are sewn together with one crotch seam.  The top of the pants are folded over to form the channel for the drawstring.  This version may be slightly tighter than how some people construct them.     

Enclosing the feet allows for pants like this to be a simplified replacement for hosen, joined hosen or some of the other enclosed pants.  Although probably an oversimplification, it is an easily constructed garment and can serve as a placeholder until one learns to ‘drape’ a pattern for hosen. Patterns are easily generated by laying an example of a normal pajama pants that fit the person on a folded pieces of paper. The pants are sewn long and the parts extending over the feet are pinned, resewn and trimmed until they fit.  Care must be taken to leave the pants loose enough to pull over the feet. 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool blends
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

Accessories

Source/Links

Greek vase showing Amazon wearing trousers Marie-Lan Nguyen (2007)

British Museum, CC BY 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5&gt;, via Wikimedia Commons

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Museum, Amazon wearing trousers
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Pants, Basic 2 Piece

TitleSCA Pants, Basic 2 Piece
Entry #GGC2021.002
Alternate NamesTrews, PJ pants,   
YearAntiquity-end of period
Time rangeAntiquity-end of period
Eraall
Genderunisex
regionall
Countries/culturesall
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage examples/

Intro:

A tunic and an outer layer coat associated with Norse cultures.  The front panels cross over each Simplified version of pants worn in many cultures and times periods from antiquity to the end of the SCA period     

Description:

Wool coat lined with linen decorated with a tablet woven band.  The coat is shown over a

One of the many variations of the pants seen in imagery from antiquity through to the end of the SCA period.   There are many works of art that do represent people in a variety of pants.  The garments can be documented and construction can be inferred in a variety of forms.  Many examples of surviving extant fragments were of wool.

Variations in pants include how baggy the garments are, how long they are, how wide the waistline is and how the waist is cinched closed.

This example is for a basic SCA ‘pajama pant’ constructed from a medium cotton material with a drawstring closure for the waist.  The pants are made in 2 parts with the seams sewn up the inside of either leg and then the legs are sewn together with one crotch seam.  The top of the pants are folded over to form the channel for the drawstring.  This version may be slightly tighter than how some people construct them.     

Patterns are easily generated by laying an example of a normal pajama pants that fit the person on a folded pieces of paper.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool blends
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

Accessories

Source/Links

Greek vase showing Amazon wearing trousers Marie-Lan Nguyen (2007)

British Museum, CC BY 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5&gt;, via Wikimedia Commons

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Museum, Amazon wearing trousers
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Braies, Long 4 Piece

TitleBraies, Long 4 Piece
Entry #GGC2021.014
Alternate NamesBraies, underwear, Breeches  
YearAntiquity-end of period
Time rangeAntiquity-end of period
EraAntiquity, Bronze age, Iron Age, early medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Attempt to replicate one of the simple versions of commonly seen undergarments.                      

Description:

.  

One of the many variations of the underwear seen in imagery from antiquity through to the end of the SCA period.  A common and personal garment like underwear is less likely to survive or be well represented in documentation.  There are many works of art that do represent people in undergarments and so the use of the garments can be documented and construction can be inferred.  Undergarments would nearly be universally constructed from linen.

Of the different styles of braies they vary in length, in how they are held up or how much fabric is used in their construction (ie, how baggy they are). Use of braies is often one of the later stages of refinement for SCA participants as they are rarely seen.  Wearing Braies can take some getting used to as they tend to have more fabric bunched up then we are modernly use to.

This is an attempt to replicate one of the very basic ‘boxer short’ style braies.  It is made from 4 pieces, either leg is sewn up the leg and sewn together with a square crotch gusset as well as an attached waist band.

The example is made out of linen and the braies are held up by rolling the waist band over a separate belt or cord tied around the waist..

Many illustrations of people from all levels of society survive showing people wearing undergarments but this example gives us insight to the construction technique.

The historical use of braies by women is assumed by us and use by members of the SCA is common.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

  • Underwear such as braies are seen through many time periods and cultures and so can be associated with many different ensembles

Accessories

Source/Links

Instructions for constructing braies like this are covered in books like Medieval Tailor’s Assistant, a very good book worth buying

source image Public Domain

http://www.medievaltymes.com/courtyard/maciejowski_images_18.htm

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period PicMaciejowski bible
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Male

Damendorf Trousers 1

TitleDamendorf Trousers 1
Entry #GGC2021.007
Alternate NamesTrews, PJ pants, hose   
Year100-300 CE
Time range100-300 CE
EraIron Age
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesGermany, Western European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty2
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Modified example of trousers found in a bog in Germany with a tailored construction and attached feet              

Description:

An extant example of trousers found in a bog near Damendorf, Rendsburg Eckerförde, Germany dated from between 100’s and 300’s CE. 

This style of pants are more complicated than the regular SCA ‘poofy pants’ that many people start out with.  There are some places online where the patterns can be found or even purchased.  This pattern has been modified from the extant example by leaving the two triangular gussets connected to the back panel.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool blends
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

The Damendorf Man was found with leather shoes, leg wraps and a leather belt.  This would also likely go with one or more tunics

Accessories

  • The Damendorf Man was found with leather shoes, leg wraps and a leather belt

Source/Links

. Archäologisches Landesmuseum Schloss Gottorf in Schleswig. Photo by by Andreas Franzkowiak

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period Pic. Archäologisches Landesmuseum Schloss Gottorf in Schleswig. Photo by by Andreas Franzkowiak
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Full Entry, Male

800 CE Male Anglo Saxon Tunic

Title800 CE Male Anglo Saxon Tunic
Entry #GGB2021.0007
Alternate Names tunic, over tunic
Year800 CE
Time range500-900 CE
EraEarly Medieval
GenderMale
regionWestern Europe
Countries/culturesEngland
MakerRichard of Wolfwood
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

A tunic style outfit with accessories common to many early or pre medieval cultures. Under tunic, over tunic, pants with leg wraps, turn shoes and a mantled hood

Description:

Few representations survive of early garments and many fewer extant examples, however what does survive would support much of what is shown here. 

The fabric shows woven in patterns that existed across Western Europe in the centuries before 1000 CE.  The basic style of layers of tunics and pants continued from before the centuries of the Roman influence to the age of Norman England. 

A base layer of a linen under tunic may have been worn below the long sleeved wool tunic and the wool outer tunic.  This example was made from Linen for use during warm summer events. 

The pants made from striped linen cloth would have been wool in period.  The leg wraps are made from strips of wool fabric but are often woven as narrow bands.  These are also know and winingas. The shoes are an early style of turn shoe.

The hood has a wide mantle and is made from light wool.  The amber would have been a common item traded from Eastern Europe.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen
    • wool
  • Ornamentation:
    • Embroidery
    • Tablet woven bands

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cotton
    • cotton-linen
    • linen-rayon
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Under tunic
  • Over Tunic

  • Pants
  • Hood

Accessories

  • Belt
  • Leg Wraps
  • Pouch
  • Turn Shoes

Source/Links

https://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/viktunic.html

Version2
date3/5/2021
Source of Period PicOriginally from MS 183, f.1v at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge
ModelRichard Jones 020213-19
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

900 CE Male Norse Tunic

Title900 CE Male Norse Tunic
Entry #GGB2021.0009
Alternate NamesT Tunic, Lendbreen tunic
Year900 CE
Time range600-1000 CE
EraEarly Medieval
GenderMale
regionNorthern Europe
Countries/cultures Northern Europe
Maker
Difficulty1
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Tunic, pants, leg wraps used in many northern European areas for a wide time frame in the early medieval era

Description:

Linen under tunic Wool tunic with woven trim at wrists, pants tied with a drawstring at the waist,  wool leg wraps, Norse style boots, belt and pouch.

Many of the male garments from across northern Europe through the early middles ages share many similarities.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen
    • wool
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cotton
    • cotton-linen
    • linen-rayon
    • wool blends
    • Scrub pants can be used for pants.  Strips of cloth can be used for leg wraps.  Various boots and shoes can be used if they do not stand out too much.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Under tunic
  • Over Tunic

  • Pants
  • Hood

Accessories

  • Belt
  • Leg Wraps
  • jewelry
  • Pouch
  • Turn Shoes
  • knife

Source/Links

https://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/viktunic.html

https://www.medievalists.net/2014/11/early-medieval-tunic-recreated-norway/

Version2
date3/5/2021
Source of Period Pichttps://www.medievalists.net/2014/11/early-medieval-tunic-recreated-norway/
ModelBjarki Vikarason 031513-02
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

900 CE Anglo Saxon Tunic

Title900 CE Anglo Saxon Tunic
Entry #GGB2021.0008
Alternate Names tunic, over tunic
Year900 CE
Time range500-900 CE
EraEarly Medieval
GenderMale
regionWestern Europe, Northern Europe
Countries/culturesEngland
MakerElspeth of Stonehaven
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

A tunic style outfit with accessories common to many early or pre medieval cultures. Under tunic, over tunic, pants with leg wraps, turn shoes and a mantled hood

Description:

Few representations survive of early garments and many fewer extant examples, however what does survive would support much of what is shown here. 

The fabric shows woven in patterns that existed across Western Europe in the centuries before 1000 CE.  The basic style of layers of tunics and pants continued from before the centuries of the Roman influence to the age of Norman England. 

A base layer of a linen under tunic may have been worn below the long sleeved wool tunic and the wool outer tunic.  This example was made from Linen for use during warm summer events. 

The pants made heavy cotton cloth would have been wool in period. 

The over tunic is decorated with embroidery

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen
    • wool
  • Ornamentation:
    • Embroidery
    • Tablet woven bands

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cotton
    • cotton-linen
    • linen-rayon
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Under tunic
  • Over Tunic

  • Pants
  • Hood

Accessories

  • Belt
  • Leg Wraps
  • Pouch
  • Turn Shoes

Source/Links

Version2
date3/5/2021
Source of Period PicBayeux tapestry
ModelTola Rufusdóhtor 020213-24
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  

Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Hose wool 1

TitleHose wool 1
Entry #GGC2021.009
Alternate Namesseparate hose, split hose, hose, hosen, stocking, chausses 
Year1000-1500 CE
Time range1000-1500 CE
Eraearly medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty2
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Examples of split hose sewn from linen and tied to the breech garter at the waist.                          

Description:

This is an example of split hose made out of wool.  They have enclosed feet and a hole at the side to tie to a belt or girdle.  They may commonly be seen with a garter tied just below the knee to assist in keeping the hose from slipping.  The garter may be a tied woven band or a band with a buckle.

There is evidence supporting the use of some form of split hose stretching to early medieval times with their height in high medieval times.  By the 1300’s the split hose were beginning to be less fashionable and were replaced by joined hose, however split hose continued to be used until the end of period. 

The longer forms of the split hose may be associated with male fashion and the short hose with women and children, but people likely wore what they preferred as well as what matched their needs.

The best hose is made out of light wool fabric that has some spring to the weave and cut on the bias (diagonally.) although very wasteful of the fabric, the bias cut means that the resulting hose are slightly more elastic and fit better. 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends
    • Wool blends

Ensemble Components

  • Hosen were worn by many different cultures and time periods and by many levels of society.  Closely associated with the hosen are the Braies worn under the hosen and the girdle or belt used to hold them up as well as the garters to keep them from slipping worn just below the knee. 

Accessories

  • Garters or woven material tied or a belt style garter.  Girdle belt or belt worn at the waist and tied to the hosen to keep them up

Source/Links

http://www.medievaltymes.com/courtyard/maciejowski_images_18.htm

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period Picmaciejowski bible
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Coif, 2 piece

TitleCoif, 2 piece
Entry #GGC2021.003
Alternate NamesCoif  
Year1000-1600 CE
Time range1000-1600 CE
EraHigh Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesGermany, Western European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Head covering made from small scraps of linen fabric.                  

Description:

It’s underwear for your head.  Many images of the middle ages feature people wearing coifs to cover and protect their hair, oils from their head from their hats and for something to connect hats to.  They also are an easy accessory to add to your

These are very simple to construct either by machine or by hand and take very little fabric.  They are easily made from cotton fabric or linen and there are surviving examples and images that show a number of variations through time or cultures.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

Accessories

Source/Links

Illustration from Cantigas de Santa Maria manuscript. The Cantigas de Santa Maria (Songs to the Virgin Mary) are manuscripts written in Galician-Portuguese, with music notation, during the reign of Alfonso X El Sabio (1221-1284).

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Library
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere