Component Entry, Male

Damendorf Trousers 1

TitleDamendorf Trousers 1
Entry #GGC2021.007
Alternate NamesTrews, PJ pants, hose   
Year100-300 CE
Time range100-300 CE
EraIron Age
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesGermany, Western European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty2
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Modified example of trousers found in a bog in Germany with a tailored construction and attached feet              

Description:

An extant example of trousers found in a bog near Damendorf, Rendsburg Eckerförde, Germany dated from between 100’s and 300’s CE. 

This style of pants are more complicated than the regular SCA ‘poofy pants’ that many people start out with.  There are some places online where the patterns can be found or even purchased.  This pattern has been modified from the extant example by leaving the two triangular gussets connected to the back panel.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool blends
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

The Damendorf Man was found with leather shoes, leg wraps and a leather belt.  This would also likely go with one or more tunics

Accessories

  • The Damendorf Man was found with leather shoes, leg wraps and a leather belt

Source/Links

. Archäologisches Landesmuseum Schloss Gottorf in Schleswig. Photo by by Andreas Franzkowiak

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period Pic. Archäologisches Landesmuseum Schloss Gottorf in Schleswig. Photo by by Andreas Franzkowiak
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Full Entry, Male

1350 CE Male Cotehardie 2

Title: 1350 CE Male Cotehardie 2
Entry #: GGB2021.055
Alternate Names: Cote 
Year: 1350 CE
Time range: 1340-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Male
region: central europe
Countries/cultures: Germany
Maker: Lisette Reuss
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

Fitted male coat forming the outer layer or the middle layer of an ensemble

Description:

In some areas in Western Europe, male garments became more fitted in the 1300s. The unfitted cotes became the tailored and fitted cotehardies. Layers associated with cotehardies would be a linen undershirt, sometimes an early form of the doublet and braies and hosen.  Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

In some cases the cotehardies are shorter to the point of reaching just to the crotch depth.  Others are seen longer to the point of knee length. Some have decorative dagged edges.  They often feature a large number of closely spaced buttons  

Male cotehardies could have long or shorter sleeves including short sleeves showing off the doublet below, sometimes featuring sleeve streamers. The sleeves of the cotehardie or the layer under the cotehardie are very tight.

This cotehardie is done in the German style with a baggier upper sleeve and is worn with breis and hosen.  A hat and coif are warn on the head and turn shoes for the feet

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool
    • silks
    • brocades
    • velvets
  • Ornamentation:
    • cloth or metal buttons

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linens
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • linen undershirt
  • likely an early form of the doublet
  • .  Turn shoes, slippers or low boots

  • braies and hosen
  • Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

Accessories

  • low slung belts, around the hips
  • pouches
  • garters
  • hood

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/21
Source of Period Pic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bologna_marriage_men.jpg
Model: Johan der hund
Photographer: Vincent de Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1490 CE German Female Housebook Dress

Title1490 CE German Female Housebook Dress
Entry #GGB2021.071
Alternate Names 
Year1490
Time range1480-1500
EraLate medieval
GenderFemale
regionCentral europe
Countries/culturesGermany
MakerAmira bint Timurhan
Difficulty3
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Dress with front and back pleated section. Most often portrayed in the a book of engravings by the Master of the Housebook.

Description:

This dress is commonly known as a housebook dress because it was frequently portrayed in a book of engravings called the Housebook. It is a dress with pleated inset in both front and back with fall into the fullness of the skirt. The haub is a pleated rectangle of fabric (I use linen) which is wound about the head to produce is shape. The tail of the haub can be tucked back into it, wound around your neck and simply left to hang.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Gown – wools, finely woven wools, brocaded or patterned cloths.  Rich textiles, collars featuring velvets and furs.  Fur trim
    • Kirtle – wools lined in linen
    • Underclothes – Linen
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Gown – Some cottons, linens, Linen blends wool blends, brocades, some poly/cotton upholstery fabrics to achieve the woven in patterns. 
    • Kirtle – Linen and linen blends, some cottons to lighten the under layers
    • Underclothes – Linen, linen blends, cottons
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Haube
  • chemise
  • hosen

  • pointed shoes
  • housebook dress

Accessories

  • thin leather belt
  • mantle (short cloak)
  • schaube (heavy long coat)
  • purse
  • apron

Source/Links

http://myra.hem.nu/costume/images/HousebookMaster/LL%28FiledtKoko1985%29/MH.StCatherine%28LLcat47%29.jpg

http://craftyagatha.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/pleat-detail3.png (detail of back pleats) http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/Images/ARTH_214images/prints/housebook_aristotle_and_phyllis.jpg

http://myra.hem.nu/costume/Documentation/Documentation.htm

Version2
date3/2/2021
Source of Period Pichttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Durer,_Portrait_of_a_Young_F%C3%BCrleger_with_Her_Hair_Done_Up.jpg
ModelAmira bint Timurhan
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1550 Female German Cranach Gown 4

Title: 1550 Female German Cranach Gown 4
Entry #: GGB2021.077
Alternate Names: Kampfrau, Trossfrau, Cranach, Saxony Court gown 
Year: 1550
Time range: 1470-1550
Era: Late medieval
Gender: Female
region: Central europe
Countries/cultures: Germany/Switzerland 
Maker: Katherine de Heilige
Difficulty: 5
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

The very stylized and flamboyant dress style seen in the SCA related to the Saxony (German) and Swiss court gowns worn by the women who followed the Landsknecht mercenary forces.  (May imply someone with a dubious occupation.) 

Description:

Highly ornamented and fanciful takes on the German and Saxony court dresses worn by flamboyant camp followers living off the spoils of war. Landsknechts and their women were not constrained by (or ignored) some of the sumptuary laws governing what people can wear.

Many of the outer garments were made from wool.  Contrasting color collars and cuffs, bight colors, rich fabrics.  No two looking the same.  Bodice laced shut exposing layers underneath.  Some necklines are very wide creating garments nearly falling off the shoulders.  Long and short sleeves are seen.  Many garments ‘slashed’ to expose layers underneath sleeves

Roll pleated skirt which could be hiked up into the belt for ease of movement but also exposing their legs. Many illustrations also show stripes of fabric parallel to the hem line on the skirts.   Patterned stockings are seen in some illustrations.  “Cow mouth” shoes with a wide toe area.

Note on Names:

Cranach – last name or two painters associated with this style

Tross – the camp followers of the mercenaries

Trossfrau/kampfrau – (maybe) a modern name given to the ‘wives’ of the mercenaries

It’s cool but read up on the culture before deciding to make one.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool main garments in bright colors, vivid patterns, rich fabrics added as trim. 
    • Silks, velvets,
    • A lot of fabric to make the dresses. 
  • Ornamentation:
    • Knitted stockings
    • linen undergarments

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Some poly/cotton brocades to simulate the rich fabrics. 
    • Wool blends are easier to find. 
    • Linen blends and cottons for undergarments. 
    • Very hard to make these dresses look right without investing in the right materials.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Gown – bodice and attached skirt
  • Placket over breasts
  • underdress

  • stockings
  • hats, including large, feathered hats

Accessories

  • Retailers catering to reenactors sell the cow mouth shoes and striped stockings in vibrant colors
  • Belts
  • pouch/purse.

Source/Links

https://sophie-stitches.weebly.com/german-saxon-cranach-gown.html

Version: 2
date: 3/2/21
Source of Period Pic: Women and Knaves, 1530CE Max Geisberg, Army Train, 1532CE Edhard Schoen
Model: Katherine de Heilige
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1550 Female German Cranach Gown 3

Title: 1550 Female German Cranach Gown 3
Entry #: GGB2021.075
Alternate Names: Kampfrau, Trossfrau, Cranach, Saxony Court gown 
Year: 1550
Time range: 1470-1550
Era: Late medieval
Gender: Female
region: Central europe
Countries/cultures: Germany/Switzerland 
Maker: Katherine de Heilige
Difficulty: 5
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

The very stylized and flamboyant dress style seen in the SCA related to the Saxony (German) and Swiss court gowns worn by the women who followed the Landsknecht mercenary forces.  (May imply someone with a dubious occupation.) 

Description:

Highly ornamented and fanciful takes on the German and Saxony court dresses worn by flamboyant camp followers living off the spoils of war. Landsknechts and their women were not constrained by (or ignored) some of the sumptuary laws governing what people can wear.

Many of the outer garments were made from wool.  Contrasting color collars and cuffs, bight colors, rich fabrics.  No two looking the same.  Bodice laced shut exposing layers underneath.  Some necklines are very wide creating garments nearly falling off the shoulders.  Long and short sleeves are seen.  Many garments ‘slashed’ to expose layers underneath sleeves

Roll pleated skirt which could be hiked up into the belt for ease of movement but also exposing their legs. Many illustrations also show stripes of fabric parallel to the hem line on the skirts.   Patterned stockings are seen in some illustrations.  “Cow mouth” shoes with a wide toe area.

Note on Names:

Cranach – last name or two painters associated with this style

Tross – the camp followers of the mercenaries

Trossfrau/kampfrau – (maybe) a modern name given to the ‘wives’ of the mercenaries

It’s cool but read up on the culture before deciding to make one.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool main garments in bright colors, vivid patterns, rich fabrics added as trim. 
    • Silks, velvets,
    • A lot of fabric to make the dresses. 
  • Ornamentation:
    • Knitted stockings
    • linen undergarments

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Some poly/cotton brocades to simulate the rich fabrics. 
    • Wool blends are easier to find. 
    • Linen blends and cottons for undergarments. 
    • Very hard to make these dresses look right without investing in the right materials.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Gown – bodice and attached skirt
  • Placket over breasts
  • underdress

  • stockings
  • hats, including large, feathered hats

Accessories

  • Retailers catering to reenactors sell the cow mouth shoes and striped stockings in vibrant colors
  • Belts
  • pouch/purse.

Source/Links

https://sophie-stitches.weebly.com/german-saxon-cranach-gown.html

Version: 2
date: 3/2/21
Source of Period Pic: Women and Knaves, 1530CE Max Geisberg, Army Train, 1532CE Edhard Schoen
Model: Emma Ness
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1550 Female German Cranach Gown 2

Title: 1550 Female German Cranach Gown 2
Entry #: GGB2021.075
Alternate Names: Kampfrau, Trossfrau, Cranach, Saxony Court gown 
Year: 1550
Time range: 1470-1550
Era: Late medieval
Gender: Female
region: Central europe
Countries/cultures: Germany/Switzerland 
Maker: Appolonia von Bremen
Difficulty: 5
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

The very stylized and flamboyant dress style seen in the SCA related to the Saxony (German) and Swiss court gowns worn by the women who followed the Landsknecht mercenary forces.  (May imply someone with a dubious occupation.) 

Description:

Highly ornamented and fanciful takes on the German and Saxony court dresses worn by flamboyant camp followers living off the spoils of war. Landsknechts and their women were not constrained by (or ignored) some of the sumptuary laws governing what people can wear.

Many of the outer garments were made from wool.  Contrasting color collars and cuffs, bight colors, rich fabrics.  No two looking the same.  Bodice laced shut exposing layers underneath.  Some necklines are very wide creating garments nearly falling off the shoulders.  Long and short sleeves are seen.  Many garments ‘slashed’ to expose layers underneath sleeves

Roll pleated skirt which could be hiked up into the belt for ease of movement but also exposing their legs. Many illustrations also show stripes of fabric parallel to the hem line on the skirts.   Patterned stockings are seen in some illustrations.  “Cow mouth” shoes with a wide toe area.

Note on Names:

Cranach – last name or two painters associated with this style

Tross – the camp followers of the mercenaries

Trossfrau/kampfrau – (maybe) a modern name given to the ‘wives’ of the mercenaries

It’s cool but read up on the culture before deciding to make one.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool main garments in bright colors, vivid patterns, rich fabrics added as trim. 
    • Silks, velvets,
    • A lot of fabric to make the dresses. 
  • Ornamentation:
    • Knitted stockings
    • linen undergarments

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Some poly/cotton brocades to simulate the rich fabrics. 
    • Wool blends are easier to find. 
    • Linen blends and cottons for undergarments. 
    • Very hard to make these dresses look right without investing in the right materials.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Gown – bodice and attached skirt
  • Placket over breasts
  • underdress

  • stockings
  • hats, including large, feathered hats

Accessories

  • Retailers catering to reenactors sell the cow mouth shoes and striped stockings in vibrant colors
  • Belts
  • pouch/purse.

Source/Links

https://sophie-stitches.weebly.com/german-saxon-cranach-gown.html

Version: 2
date: 3/2/21
Source of Period Pic: Women and Knaves, 1530CE Max Geisberg, Army Train, 1532CE Edhard Schoen
Model: Bearcat
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1550 Female German Cranach Gown 1

Title: 1550 Female German Cranach Gown 1
Entry #: GGB2021.074
Alternate Names: Kampfrau, Trossfrau, Cranach, Saxony Court gown 
Year: 1550
Time range: 1470-1550
Era: Late medieval
Gender: Female
region: Central europe
Countries/cultures: Germany/Switzerland 
Maker: Bearcat
Difficulty: 5
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

The very stylized and flamboyant dress style seen in the SCA related to the Saxony (German) and Swiss court gowns worn by the women who followed the Landsknecht mercenary forces.  (May imply someone with a dubious occupation.) 

Description:

Highly ornamented and fanciful takes on the German and Saxony court dresses worn by flamboyant camp followers living off the spoils of war. Landsknechts and their women were not constrained by (or ignored) some of the sumptuary laws governing what people can wear.

Many of the outer garments were made from wool.  Contrasting color collars and cuffs, bight colors, rich fabrics.  No two looking the same.  Bodice laced shut exposing layers underneath.  Some necklines are very wide creating garments nearly falling off the shoulders.  Long and short sleeves are seen.  Many garments ‘slashed’ to expose layers underneath sleeves

Roll pleated skirt which could be hiked up into the belt for ease of movement but also exposing their legs. Many illustrations also show stripes of fabric parallel to the hem line on the skirts.   Patterned stockings are seen in some illustrations.  “Cow mouth” shoes with a wide toe area.

Note on Names:

Cranach – last name or two painters associated with this style

Tross – the camp followers of the mercenaries

Trossfrau/kampfrau – (maybe) a modern name given to the ‘wives’ of the mercenaries

It’s cool but read up on the culture before deciding to make one.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool main garments in bright colors, vivid patterns, rich fabrics added as trim. 
    • Silks, velvets,
    • A lot of fabric to make the dresses. 
  • Ornamentation:
    • Knitted stockings
    • linen undergarments

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Some poly/cotton brocades to simulate the rich fabrics. 
    • Wool blends are easier to find. 
    • Linen blends and cottons for undergarments. 
    • Very hard to make these dresses look right without investing in the right materials.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Gown – bodice and attached skirt
  • Placket over breasts
  • underdress

  • stockings
  • hats, including large, feathered hats

Accessories

  • Retailers catering to reenactors sell the cow mouth shoes and striped stockings in vibrant colors
  • Belts
  • pouch/purse.

Source/Links

https://sophie-stitches.weebly.com/german-saxon-cranach-gown.html

Version: 2
date: 3/2/21
Source of Period Pic: Women and Knaves, 1530CE Max Geisberg, Army Train, 1532CE Edhard Schoen
Model: Bearcat
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

1500 CE German Male Landsknecht

Title1500 CE German Male Landsknecht
Entry #GGB2021.085
Alternate Names Waffenkleid, Reitrock, waffenrock
Year1500
Time range1470-1550 CE
EraLate Medieval
GenderMale
regionCentral Europe
Countries/culturesGermany/Switzerland
Maker
Difficulty4
ConfidenceImage of Example

Intro:

Highly ornamented “war coats” worn by military forces out of areas around Germany and Switzerland.  Closely associated with (and evolving into) the more flamboyant Landsknecht mercenaries

Description:

Bright clashing colors, bold stripes mismatched parts.  Sleeves and legs with decorative slashes.  Wool over garments worn by mercenaries and often scavenged from the best parts found on the battlefield.  The top buttons closed and the garment is worn over at least an undershirt, and breeches.  Usually seen with long stockings and sometimes with the wide ‘cow mouth’ shoes. The sleeves and skirt portions have a lot of fabric pleated in. 

Related terms:

Waffenrock: war coat

Reitrock: riding coat, split for riding

Waffenkleid: war tunic

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool main garments in bright colors, or color combinations. 
    • linen undergarments
  • Ornamentation:
    • Knitted stockings

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Some poly/cotton brocades to simulate the rich fabrics.  Wool blends are easier to find. 
    • Linen blends and cottons for undergarments. 
    • Very hard to make these look right without investing in the right materials.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Coat – wool overlayer with attached skirt
  • Undershirt – linen shirt

  • Breeches – wool pants to the knee
  • Stockings

Accessories

  • Retailers catering to reenactors sell the cow mouth shoes and striped stockings in vibrant colors. 
  • Belt
  • pouch/purse.

Source/Links

http://research.fibergeek.com/category/garbclothing/16th-century/landsknecht-waffenrock-1517/

Version2
date3/2/2021
Source of Period Pic 
ModelBrockman 031113-10
PhotographerVincent De Vere