Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Coif, 3 piece

TitleCoif, 3 piece
Entry #GGC2021.004
Alternate NamesCoif  
Year1000-1600 CE
Time range1000-1600 CE
EraHigh Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesGermany, Western European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Head covering made from small scraps of linen fabric.                  

Description:

It’s underwear for your head.  Many images of the middle ages feature people wearing coifs to cover and protect their hair, oils from their head from their hats and for something to connect hats to.  They also are an easy accessory to add to your

These are very simple to construct either by machine or by hand and take very little fabric.  They are easily made from cotton fabric or linen and there are surviving examples and images that show a number of variations through time or cultures.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

Accessories

Source/Links

Illustration from Cantigas de Santa Maria manuscript. The Cantigas de Santa Maria (Songs to the Virgin Mary) are manuscripts written in Galician-Portuguese, with music notation, during the reign of Alfonso X El Sabio (1221-1284).

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Library
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Hose Linen 1

TitleHose Linen 1
Entry #GGC2021.008
Alternate Namesseparate hose, split hose, hose, hosen, stocking, chausses 
Year1000-1500 CE
Time range1000-1500 CE
Eraearly medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty2
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Examples of split hose sewn from linen and tied to the breech garter at the waist.                          

Description:

This is an example of split hose made out of linen and parti-colored.  They have enclosed feet and a hole at the side to tie to a belt or girdle.  They may commonly be seen with a garter tied just below the knee to assist in keeping the hose from slipping.  The garter may be a tied woven band or a band with a buckle.

There is evidence supporting the use of some form of split hose stretching to early medieval times with their height in high medieval times.  By the 1300’s the split hose were beginning to be less fashionable and were replaced by joined hose, however split hose continued to be used until the end of period. 

The longer forms of the split hose may be associated with male fashion and the short hose with women and children, but people likely wore what they preferred as well as what matched their needs.

The best hose is made out of light wool fabric that has some spring to the weave and cut on the bias (diagonally.) although very wasteful of the fabric, the bias cut means that the resulting hose are slightly more elastic and fit better. 

The historical use of various kinds of hose by women is assumed by us and use by members does occur.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends
    • Wool blends

Ensemble Components

  • Hosen were worn by many different cultures and time periods and by many levels of society.  Closely associated with the hosen are the Braies worn under the hosen and the girdle or belt used to hold them up as well as the garters to keep them from slipping worn just below the knee. 

Accessories

  • Garters or woven material tied or a belt style garter.  Girdle belt or belt worn at the waist and tied to the hosen to keep them up

Source/Links

http://www.medievaltymes.com/courtyard/maciejowski_images_18.htm

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period Picmaciejowski bible
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Hose wool 1

TitleHose wool 1
Entry #GGC2021.009
Alternate Namesseparate hose, split hose, hose, hosen, stocking, chausses 
Year1000-1500 CE
Time range1000-1500 CE
Eraearly medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty2
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Examples of split hose sewn from linen and tied to the breech garter at the waist.                          

Description:

This is an example of split hose made out of wool.  They have enclosed feet and a hole at the side to tie to a belt or girdle.  They may commonly be seen with a garter tied just below the knee to assist in keeping the hose from slipping.  The garter may be a tied woven band or a band with a buckle.

There is evidence supporting the use of some form of split hose stretching to early medieval times with their height in high medieval times.  By the 1300’s the split hose were beginning to be less fashionable and were replaced by joined hose, however split hose continued to be used until the end of period. 

The longer forms of the split hose may be associated with male fashion and the short hose with women and children, but people likely wore what they preferred as well as what matched their needs.

The best hose is made out of light wool fabric that has some spring to the weave and cut on the bias (diagonally.) although very wasteful of the fabric, the bias cut means that the resulting hose are slightly more elastic and fit better. 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends
    • Wool blends

Ensemble Components

  • Hosen were worn by many different cultures and time periods and by many levels of society.  Closely associated with the hosen are the Braies worn under the hosen and the girdle or belt used to hold them up as well as the garters to keep them from slipping worn just below the knee. 

Accessories

  • Garters or woven material tied or a belt style garter.  Girdle belt or belt worn at the waist and tied to the hosen to keep them up

Source/Links

http://www.medievaltymes.com/courtyard/maciejowski_images_18.htm

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period Picmaciejowski bible
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Apron, gathered

TitleApron, gathered
Entry #GGC2021.016
Alternate NamesApron
Year1000-1600 CE
Time range1000-1600 CE
Eraearly medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Basic gathered apron made from one yard of linen fabric                               

Description:

This apron is made from three pieces with two long narrow strips sewn into the waistband and one large rectangle gathered along the waistband to form the main portion of the apron.

Aprons are easily constructed accessories that are also functional accessories to use with your SCA clothing.  They can easily be made in a few minutes by machine or just a couple hours by hand.  They add to the completeness of an ensemble by adding another layer to the look.  They are also very functional in protecting the clothing beneath it.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

  •  

Accessories

Source/Links

c 1300-c 1340, The Decretals of Gregory IX, edited by Raymund of Penyafort (or Peñafort); with the glossa ordinaria of Bernard of Parma in the margin. 

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Library
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Coif, 2 piece

TitleCoif, 2 piece
Entry #GGC2021.003
Alternate NamesCoif  
Year1000-1600 CE
Time range1000-1600 CE
EraHigh Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesGermany, Western European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceExtant Example

Intro:

Head covering made from small scraps of linen fabric.                  

Description:

It’s underwear for your head.  Many images of the middle ages feature people wearing coifs to cover and protect their hair, oils from their head from their hats and for something to connect hats to.  They also are an easy accessory to add to your

These are very simple to construct either by machine or by hand and take very little fabric.  They are easily made from cotton fabric or linen and there are surviving examples and images that show a number of variations through time or cultures.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

Accessories

Source/Links

Illustration from Cantigas de Santa Maria manuscript. The Cantigas de Santa Maria (Songs to the Virgin Mary) are manuscripts written in Galician-Portuguese, with music notation, during the reign of Alfonso X El Sabio (1221-1284).

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Library
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Full Entry, Male

1100 CE Grayfriar (Cistercian) Habit 1

Title: 1100 CE Grayfriar (Cistercian) Habit 1
Entry #: GGB2021.032
Alternate Names: Friar Robes, monks robes 
Year: 1100 CE
Time range: 1100 – end of period
Era: High medieval
Gender: Male
region: Europe
Countries/cultures: Europe
Maker: Vincent De Vere
Difficulty: 1
Confidence: Extant Examples

Intro:

Long belted tunic with a belt of leather, cloth or rope.  A scapula, the tabard like rectangle of cloth with a cowl or hood attached. 

Description:

Generally unadorned, color of the fabric denotes particular religious order the wearer belongs to. The belt could be leather but some references say rope was more common. 

Over time the colors of the different orders became nearly standardized.  The Benedictine Monks would dye the wool they used to make their habits leading to names such as Black Monks or Blackfriar.  The Cistercian Monks who arose in the 1100’s opted for undyed wool to show their adherence to poverty.  This led to names like White monks or Grayfriars.  There ae still many places across England with location names of Blackfriars and Grayfriars. 

This attempt at a Cistercian habit used linen instead of wool for the long tunic and brown wool for the scapula.

Any portrayal of religious personages at events should be done with respect to the beliefs of others.   

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • wool
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen
    • cotton
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • tunic
  • scapula hood

  • belt

Accessories

  • pouch
  • rosary

Source/Links

Version: 2
date: 3/5/2021
Source of Period Pic: Life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux by Jörg Breu the Elder 1500
Model: Vincent De Vere
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

1200 CE Male Wool Cote

Title: 1200 CE Male Wool Cote
Entry #: GGB2021.041
Alternate Names: Gown, Frock coat, Tunic, over tunic, 
Year: 1200
Time range: 1100-1400 CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Male
region: Europe
Countries/cultures: Europe
Maker: Gwen A’Brooke
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

A loose tunic like garment commonly with buttons at the neck and cuffs bloused over a belt. Extending from below the waste to below the knee with long sleeves.

Description:

This garment, or variations of it can be seen in many paintings and illustrations that cross over several regions and time frames.  People from many stations in society use this functional garment, from laborers to merchants and higher. Varying slightly from its beginnings before 1100CE and fading in fashion for all but laborers late in period.

In general it is slightly more tailored tunic with the neck hole held closed by use of buttons rather than the earlier broaches.  Buttons may just close the neck hole, extend part way down the chest or to the bottom of the garment.  The cut is usually full producing a baggy garment belted at the waste and bloused over the belt.  Some assign the length of the garment to station, with average workmen wearing it shorter to the more wealthy merchants wearing a longer garment.

Likely worn with an undershirt and in some cases a simple doublet as well as hosen or trews.

Sometimes underrepresented in the SCA, cotes can easily produce a medieval look with an easily constructed garment.

This example has layers of cotes with a tight neck hole.  Split for ease of movement below the waist.  These are very tunic like cotes.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool
    • linen
    • brocade
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • wool blends
    • linen blends
    • cottons
    • lighter weight upholstery fabrics that simulate period patterns
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Cote
  • Under Tunic

  • possibly a doublet
  • pants or braes/hosen

Accessories

  • belt
  • pouch
  • hat
  • shoes

Source/Links

The Medieval Tailors Assistant, by Sarah Thursfield, has instructions on constructing such

Version:3
date: 2/27/2021
Source of Period Pic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:48-aspetti_di_vita_quotidiana_ubriachezza_Taccuino_Sanitatis_Shoes.jpg
Model: Ulfr Thyrison
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

1200 CE Male Linen Cote

Title: 1200 CE Male Linen Cote
Entry #: GGB2021.041
Alternate Names: Gown, Frock coat, Tunic, over tunic, 
Year: 1200
Time range: 1100-1400 CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Male
region: Europe
Countries/cultures: Europe
Maker: Vincent De Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

A loose tunic like garment commonly with buttons at the neck and cuffs bloused over a belt. Extending from below the waste to below the knee with long sleeves.

Description:

This garment, or variations of it can be seen in many paintings and illustrations that cross over several regions and time frames.  People from many stations in society use this functional garment, from laborers to merchants and higher. Varying slightly from its beginnings before 1100CE and fading in fashion for all but laborers late in period.

In general it is slightly more tailored tunic with the neck hole held closed by use of buttons rather than the earlier broaches.  Buttons may just close the neck hole, extend part way down the chest or to the bottom of the garment.  The cut is usually full producing a baggy garment belted at the waste and bloused over the belt.  Some assign the length of the garment to station, with average workmen wearing it shorter to the more wealthy merchants wearing a longer garment.

Likely worn with an undershirt and in some cases a simple doublet as well as hosen or trews.

Sometimes underrepresented in the SCA, cotes can easily produce a medieval look with an easily constructed garment.

This example has layers of cotes with a tight neck hole.  Split for ease of movement below the waist.  These are very tunic like cotes.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool
    • linen
    • brocade
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • wool blends
    • linen blends
    • cottons
    • lighter weight upholstery fabrics that simulate period patterns
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Cote
  • Under Tunic

  • possibly a doublet
  • pants or braes/hosen

Accessories

  • belt
  • pouch
  • hat
  • shoes

Source/Links

The Medieval Tailors Assistant, by Sarah Thursfield, has instructions on constructing such

Version:2
date: 2/27/2021
Source of Period Pic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:48-aspetti_di_vita_quotidiana_ubriachezza_Taccuino_Sanitatis_Shoes.jpg
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1200 CE Female Sideless Surcote 2

Title: 1200 CE Female Sideless Surcote 2
Entry #: GGB2021.040
Alternate Names: pellote 
Year: 1200 CE
Time range: 1100-1300’s CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Female
region: European, western europe
Countries/cultures: England, france, spain
Maker: Beocca the Fair of Hastings
Difficulty: 1
Confidence: extant examples

Intro:

Outer layer garment with deeply cut arm holes worn with often form fitted undergarments that came in many variations and with examples for all sexes.

Description:

Sideless Surcotes are easily spotted by the deeply cut arm holes.  They commonly expose a more fitted garment beneath such as kirtles or fitted cotes. 

Parti-colored sideless surcote worn with a mantled hood.

These over dresses could vary from heraldic lesser modified cotes to heavily modified overdresses with narrow vertical front bands.  Easily sewn and open for many variations and modifications. Used in many parts of Europe during the first part of the high middle ages

Variations can include constructed materials, fur trim, heraldic displays, variations of depth of armhole, width of plastron (front and back bands,) width of hem, style of fitted under dress.

Inspiration Images

Medieval Combat Society

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Salk
    • celvets
    • brocades
    • fine wools
    • extant examples found constructed from silk damasks and jacquard
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Silks
    • velvets
    • brocades
    • fine to medium coarse wools
    • wool blends
    • linen and linen blends
    • substituting poly velvets for silk velvets, or cotton velveteen – Not stretch velvets or crushed velvets.
  • Ornamentation:
    • High quality fake furs for trimming and lining. 

Ensemble Components

  • Sideless Surcote
  • Kirtle or cote
  • Underdress/undergarments

  • knee length hose
  • turn shoes or slippers
  • mantled hood

Accessories

  • belt
  • (worn under the surcote and over the fitted garment)
  • coif/hat/veil – works well with a barbette and fillet

Source/Links

http://www.wodefordhall.com/surcote.htm

http://www.bayrose.org/AandS/handouts/Sideless_Surcoat_web.pdf

Version: 2
date: 3/6/21
Source of Period Pic: http://www.insecula.com/oeuvre/O0000311.html
Model: Beocca the Fair of Hastings
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1200 CE Female Sideless Surcote 1

Title: 1200 CE Female Sideless Surcote 1
Entry #: GGB2021.039
Alternate Names: pellote 
Year: 1200 CE
Time range: 1100-1300’s CE
Era: High medieval
Gender: Female
region: European, western europe
Countries/cultures: England, france, spain
Maker: Jacqueline Storme
Difficulty: 1
Confidence: extant examples

Intro:

Outer layer garment with deeply cut arm holes worn with often form fitted undergarments that came in many variations and with examples for all sexes.

Description:

Sideless Surcotes are easily spotted by the deeply cut arm holes.  They commonly expose a more fitted garment beneath such as kirtles or fitted cotes. 

Parti-colored sideless surcote worn with a mantled hood.

These over dresses could vary from heraldic lesser modified cotes to heavily modified overdresses with narrow vertical front bands.  Easily sewn and open for many variations and modifications. Used in many parts of Europe during the first part of the high middle ages

Variations can include constructed materials, fur trim, heraldic displays, variations of depth of armhole, width of plastron (front and back bands,) width of hem, style of fitted under dress.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Salk
    • celvets
    • brocades
    • fine wools
    • extant examples found constructed from silk damasks and jacquard
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Silks
    • velvets
    • brocades
    • fine to medium coarse wools
    • wool blends
    • linen and linen blends
    • substituting poly velvets for silk velvets, or cotton velveteen – Not stretch velvets or crushed velvets.
  • Ornamentation:
    • High quality fake furs for trimming and lining. 

Ensemble Components

  • Sideless Surcote
  • Kirtle or cote
  • Underdress/undergarments

  • knee length hose
  • turn shoes or slippers
  • mantled hood

Accessories

  • belt
  • (worn under the surcote and over the fitted garment)
  • coif/hat/veil – works well with a barbette and fillet

Source/Links

http://www.wodefordhall.com/surcote.htm

http://www.bayrose.org/AandS/handouts/Sideless_Surcoat_web.pdf

Version: 2
date: 3/6/21
Source of Period Pic: http://www.insecula.com/oeuvre/O0000311.html
Model: Jacqueline Storme
Photographer: Jacqueline Storme