Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Braies, Simple Short 3 Piece

TitleBraies, Simple Short 3 Piece
Entry #GGC2021.012
Alternate NamesBraies, underwear, Breeches  
YearAntiquity-end of period
Time rangeAntiquity-end of period
EraAntiquity, Bronze age, Iron Age, early medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Attempt to replicate one of the simple versions of commonly seen undergarments.                      

Description:

Many illustrations of people from all levels of society survive showing people wearing

One of the many variations of the underwear seen in imagery from antiquity through to the end of the SCA period.  A common and personal garment like underwear is less likely to survive or be well represented in documentation.  There are many works of art that do represent people in undergarments and so the use of the garments can be documented and construction can be inferred.  Undergarments would nearly be universally constructed from linen.

Of the different styles of braies they vary in length, in how they are held up or how much fabric is used in their construction (ie, how baggy they are). Use of braies is often one of the later stages of refinement for SCA participants as they are rarely seen.  Wearing Braies can take some getting used to as they tend to have more fabric bunched up then we are modernly use to.

This is an attempt to replicate one of the very basic ‘boxer short’ style braies.  It is made from 3 pieces, either leg is sewn up the leg and sewn together with a central panel between either side.  The waistline is folded over to allow for a drawstring.

The example is made out of linen and using a shoestring for the drawstring.

The historical use of braies by women is assumed by us and use by members of the SCA is common.

.  

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

  • Underwear such as braies are seen through many time periods and cultures and so can be associated with many different ensembles

Accessories

Source/Links

Instructions for constructing braies like this are covered in books like Medieval Tailor’s Assistant, a very good book worth buying

source image Public Domain

A loincloth in 1412 Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period PicA loincloth in 1412 Très Riches Heuresdu Duc de Berry
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Braies, Short 5 Piece

TitleBraies, Short 5 Piece
Entry #GGC2021.013
Alternate NamesBraies, underwear, Breeches  
YearAntiquity-end of period
Time rangeAntiquity-end of period
EraAntiquity, Bronze age, Iron Age, early medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Attempt to replicate one of the simple versions of commonly seen undergarments.                      

Description:

Many illustrations of people from all levels of society survive showing people wearing

One of the many variations of the underwear seen in imagery from antiquity through to the end of the SCA period.  A common and personal garment like underwear is less likely to survive or be well represented in documentation.  There are many works of art that do represent people in undergarments and so the use of the garments can be documented and construction can be inferred.  Undergarments would nearly be universally constructed from linen.

Of the different styles of braies they vary in length, in how they are held up or how much fabric is used in their construction (ie, how baggy they are). Use of braies is often one of the later stages of refinement for SCA participants as they are rarely seen.  Wearing Braies can take some getting used to as they tend to have more fabric bunched up then we are modernly use to.

This is an attempt to replicate one of the very basic ‘boxer short’ style braies.  It is made from 5 pieces, either leg is sewn up the leg and sewn together with a central panel made from a front and back panel as well as bottom gusset. The waistline is folded over to allow for a drawstring.

The example is made out of linen and using a shoestring for the drawstring.

The historical use of braies by women is assumed by us and use by members of the SCA is common.

.  

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

  • Underwear such as braies are seen through many time periods and cultures and so can be associated with many different ensembles

Accessories

Source/Links

Instructions for constructing braies like this are covered in books like Medieval Tailor’s Assistant, a very good book worth buying

source image Public Domain

A loincloth in 1412 Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry

Version1
date12/25/2021
Source of Period PicA loincloth in 1412 Très Riches Heuresdu Duc de Berry
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Hose wool 1

TitleHose wool 1
Entry #GGC2021.009
Alternate Namesseparate hose, split hose, hose, hosen, stocking, chausses 
Year1000-1500 CE
Time range1000-1500 CE
Eraearly medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty2
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Examples of split hose sewn from linen and tied to the breech garter at the waist.                          

Description:

This is an example of split hose made out of wool.  They have enclosed feet and a hole at the side to tie to a belt or girdle.  They may commonly be seen with a garter tied just below the knee to assist in keeping the hose from slipping.  The garter may be a tied woven band or a band with a buckle.

There is evidence supporting the use of some form of split hose stretching to early medieval times with their height in high medieval times.  By the 1300’s the split hose were beginning to be less fashionable and were replaced by joined hose, however split hose continued to be used until the end of period. 

The longer forms of the split hose may be associated with male fashion and the short hose with women and children, but people likely wore what they preferred as well as what matched their needs.

The best hose is made out of light wool fabric that has some spring to the weave and cut on the bias (diagonally.) although very wasteful of the fabric, the bias cut means that the resulting hose are slightly more elastic and fit better. 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • wool
    • cotton
    • cotton blends
    • Wool blends

Ensemble Components

  • Hosen were worn by many different cultures and time periods and by many levels of society.  Closely associated with the hosen are the Braies worn under the hosen and the girdle or belt used to hold them up as well as the garters to keep them from slipping worn just below the knee. 

Accessories

  • Garters or woven material tied or a belt style garter.  Girdle belt or belt worn at the waist and tied to the hosen to keep them up

Source/Links

http://www.medievaltymes.com/courtyard/maciejowski_images_18.htm

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period Picmaciejowski bible
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Component Entry, Female, Male, Unisex

Apron, gathered

TitleApron, gathered
Entry #GGC2021.016
Alternate NamesApron
Year1000-1600 CE
Time range1000-1600 CE
Eraearly medieval, high Medieval, Late Medieval
Genderunisex
regionEuropean
Countries/culturesWestern European, Central European
MakerVincent De Vere,
Difficulty1
ConfidenceImage Example

Intro:

Basic gathered apron made from one yard of linen fabric                               

Description:

This apron is made from three pieces with two long narrow strips sewn into the waistband and one large rectangle gathered along the waistband to form the main portion of the apron.

Aprons are easily constructed accessories that are also functional accessories to use with your SCA clothing.  They can easily be made in a few minutes by machine or just a couple hours by hand.  They add to the completeness of an ensemble by adding another layer to the look.  They are also very functional in protecting the clothing beneath it.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Linen  

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • linen blends
    • Linen
    • cotton
    • cotton blends

Ensemble Components

  •  

Accessories

Source/Links

c 1300-c 1340, The Decretals of Gregory IX, edited by Raymund of Penyafort (or Peñafort); with the glossa ordinaria of Bernard of Parma in the margin. 

Version1
date12/30/2021
Source of Period PicBritish Library
Model Vincent de Vere
PhotographerVincent De Vere
  
Full Entry, Male

1350 CE Male Cotehardie 6

Title: 1350 CE Male Cotehardie 6
Entry #: GGB2021.059
Alternate Names: Cote 
Year: 1350 CE
Time range: 1340-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Male
region: Western europe, central europe
Countries/cultures: France, England, germany
Maker: Vincent de Vere
Difficulty: 3
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

Fitted male coat forming the outer layer or the middle layer of an ensemble

Description:

In some areas in Western Europe, male garments became more fitted in the 1300s. The unfitted cotes became the tailored and fitted cotehardies. Layers associated with cotehardies would be a linen undershirt, sometimes an early form of the doublet and braies and hosen.  Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

In some cases the cotehardies are shorter to the point of reaching just to the crotch depth.  Others are seen longer to the point of knee length. Some have decorative dagged edges.  They often feature a large number of closely spaced buttons  

Male cotehardies could have long or shorter sleeves including short sleeves showing off the doublet below, sometimes featuring sleeve streamers. The sleeves of the cotehardie or the layer under the cotehardie are very tight.

This cotehardie is a parti colored light weight linen cotehardie with a dagged liripipe hood.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool
    • silks
    • brocades
    • velvets
  • Ornamentation:
    • cloth or metal buttons

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linens
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • linen undershirt
  • likely an early form of the doublet
  • .  Turn shoes, slippers or low boots

  • braies and hosen
  • Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

Accessories

  • low slung belts, around the hips
  • pouches
  • garters
  • hood

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/21
Source of Period Pic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bologna_marriage_men.jpg
Model:
Photographer: Vincent de Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1370 CE Female, Cotehardie 5

Title: 1370 CE Female, Cotehardie 5
Entry #: GGB2021.051
Alternate Names: Gothic Fitted Dress 
Year: 1370
Time range: 1350-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western europe, central europe
Countries/cultures: France, England,
Maker: Vincent de Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

Fitted female garment forming an outer or middle layer.  

Description:

Purple and gold parti colored cotehardie over white kirtle
  As female garments became more fitted in the 1300s the unfitted tunic like dresses became more tailored and fitted. 
 A loose shift or slip like garment could be worn as a base layer.  There is limited evidence for underwear.  The bust could be supported with just the fitted layers.
 A kirtle layer worn between the shift and the cotehardie could be laced up the front and the sleeves could be buttoned or laced.  The kirtle layer is often fitted as to be supportive in the bust and not as long as the cotehardie layer. 
 The cotehardie layer over the kirtle later adds to the support of the bust line.  The neck line could be plunging or more modest.  The dress is often shown with a large number of closely spaced buttons on a front closure. The sleeves could be short, short with sleeve streamers (a very stereotypical cotehardie look) or longer.  Some examples extend over the hand almost to the fingers.  The cotehardie layer would be floor length.  The belt is often shown slung low on the hips.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • fine cloths
    • silks
    • brocades
    • fine wools
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Silks
    • linens
    • linen blends with rayon or cotton
    • brocades.
    • Some cotton poly brocades can work to mimic the look of rich brocades, but the higher the poly content the more unpleasant the garment is to wear.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Slip/shift
  • Kirtle Cotehardie
  • purse

  • coifs/undercaps/hoods
  • belt
  • turnshoes

Accessories

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/2021
Source of Period Pic:
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

1350 CE Male Cotehardie 5

Title: 1350 CE Male Cotehardie 5
Entry #: GGB2021.058
Alternate Names: Cote 
Year: 1350 CE
Time range: 1340-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Male
region: Western europe, central europe
Countries/cultures: France, England, germany
Maker: Vincent de Vere
Difficulty: 3
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

Fitted male coat forming the outer layer or the middle layer of an ensemble

Description:

In some areas in Western Europe, male garments became more fitted in the 1300s. The unfitted cotes became the tailored and fitted cotehardies. Layers associated with cotehardies would be a linen undershirt, sometimes an early form of the doublet and braies and hosen.  Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

In some cases the cotehardies are shorter to the point of reaching just to the crotch depth.  Others are seen longer to the point of knee length. Some have decorative dagged edges.  They often feature a large number of closely spaced buttons  

Male cotehardies could have long or shorter sleeves including short sleeves showing off the doublet below, sometimes featuring sleeve streamers. The sleeves of the cotehardie or the layer under the cotehardie are very tight.

This cotehardie is a light weight linen cotehardie with the outer layer having sleeves with tippets or sleeve streamers 

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool
    • silks
    • brocades
    • velvets
  • Ornamentation:
    • cloth or metal buttons

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linens
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • linen undershirt
  • likely an early form of the doublet
  • .  Turn shoes, slippers or low boots

  • braies and hosen
  • Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

Accessories

  • low slung belts, around the hips
  • pouches
  • garters
  • hood

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/21
Source of Period Pic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bologna_marriage_men.jpg
Model:
Photographer: Vincent de Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1370 CE Female, Cotehardie 4

Title: 1370 CE Female, Cotehardie 4
Entry #: GGB2021.050
Alternate Names: Gothic Fitted Dress 
Year: 1370
Time range: 1350-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western europe, central europe
Countries/cultures: France, England,
Maker: Vincent de Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

Fitted female garment forming an outer or middle layer.  

Description:

Blue linen/rayon cotehardie over white kirtle with white sleeve streamers (aka tippets)
  As female garments became more fitted in the 1300s the unfitted tunic like dresses became more tailored and fitted. 
 A loose shift or slip like garment could be worn as a base layer.  There is limited evidence for underwear.  The bust could be supported with just the fitted layers.
 A kirtle layer worn between the shift and the cotehardie could be laced up the front and the sleeves could be buttoned or laced.  The kirtle layer is often fitted as to be supportive in the bust and not as long as the cotehardie layer. 
 The cotehardie layer over the kirtle later adds to the support of the bust line.  The neck line could be plunging or more modest.  The dress is often shown with a large number of closely spaced buttons on a front closure. The sleeves could be short, short with sleeve streamers (a very stereotypical cotehardie look) or longer.  Some examples extend over the hand almost to the fingers.  The cotehardie layer would be floor length.  The belt is often shown slung low on the hips.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • fine cloths
    • silks
    • brocades
    • fine wools
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Silks
    • linens
    • linen blends with rayon or cotton
    • brocades.
    • Some cotton poly brocades can work to mimic the look of rich brocades, but the higher the poly content the more unpleasant the garment is to wear.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Slip/shift
  • Kirtle Cotehardie
  • purse

  • coifs/undercaps/hoods
  • belt
  • turnshoes

Accessories

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/2021
Source of Period Pic:
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere
  

Full Entry, Male

1350 CE Male Cotehardie 4

Title: 1350 CE Male Cotehardie 4
Entry #: GGB2021.057
Alternate Names: Cote 
Year: 1350 CE
Time range: 1340-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Male
region: Western europe, central europe
Countries/cultures: France, England, germany
Maker: Vincent de Vere
Difficulty: 4
Confidence: Image Example

Intro:

Fitted male coat forming the outer layer or the middle layer of an ensemble

Description:

In some areas in Western Europe, male garments became more fitted in the 1300s. The unfitted cotes became the tailored and fitted cotehardies. Layers associated with cotehardies would be a linen undershirt, sometimes an early form of the doublet and braies and hosen.  Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

In some cases the cotehardies are shorter to the point of reaching just to the crotch depth.  Others are seen longer to the point of knee length. Some have decorative dagged edges.  They often feature a large number of closely spaced buttons  

Male cotehardies could have long or shorter sleeves including short sleeves showing off the doublet below, sometimes featuring sleeve streamers. The sleeves of the cotehardie or the layer under the cotehardie are very tight.

This cotehardie has the group livery colors and has silk stripes appliqued on the silk cotehardie lined in linen and a liripipe hood with dagges

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • Wool
    • silks
    • brocades
    • velvets
  • Ornamentation:
    • cloth or metal buttons

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • cottons
    • linens
    • linen blends
    • wool blends
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • linen undershirt
  • likely an early form of the doublet
  • .  Turn shoes, slippers or low boots

  • braies and hosen
  • Layers over the cotehardie could be gowns and houppelandes

Accessories

  • low slung belts, around the hips
  • pouches
  • garters
  • hood

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/21
Source of Period Pic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bologna_marriage_men.jpg
Model:
Photographer: Vincent de Vere
  

Female, Full Entry

1370 CE Female, Cotehardie 3

Title: 1370 CE Female, Cotehardie 3
Entry #: GGB2021.049
Alternate Names: Gothic Fitted Dress 
Year: 1370
Time range: 1350-1400 CE
Era: High Medieval
Gender: Female
region: Western europe, central europe
Countries/cultures: France, England,
Maker: Vincent de Vere
Difficulty: 2
Confidence: Image Examples

Intro:

Fitted female garment forming an outer or middle layer.  

Description:

Purple linen/rayon cotehardie over white kirtle with white sleeve streamers (aka tippets)
  As female garments became more fitted in the 1300s the unfitted tunic like dresses became more tailored and fitted. 
 A loose shift or slip like garment could be worn as a base layer.  There is limited evidence for underwear.  The bust could be supported with just the fitted layers.
 A kirtle layer worn between the shift and the cotehardie could be laced up the front and the sleeves could be buttoned or laced.  The kirtle layer is often fitted as to be supportive in the bust and not as long as the cotehardie layer. 
 The cotehardie layer over the kirtle later adds to the support of the bust line.  The neck line could be plunging or more modest.  The dress is often shown with a large number of closely spaced buttons on a front closure. The sleeves could be short, short with sleeve streamers (a very stereotypical cotehardie look) or longer.  Some examples extend over the hand almost to the fingers.  The cotehardie layer would be floor length.  The belt is often shown slung low on the hips.

Inspiration Images

Common Materials

  • Fabrics:
    • fine cloths
    • silks
    • brocades
    • fine wools
  • Ornamentation:

Effective Substitutions

  • Fabrics:
    • Silks
    • linens
    • linen blends with rayon or cotton
    • brocades.
    • Some cotton poly brocades can work to mimic the look of rich brocades, but the higher the poly content the more unpleasant the garment is to wear.
  • Ornamentation:

Ensemble Components

  • Slip/shift
  • Kirtle Cotehardie
  • purse

  • coifs/undercaps/hoods
  • belt
  • turnshoes

Accessories

Source/Links

http://www.chesholme.com/wfiles/2-1-Cotehardie.pdf

http://starsandgarters.org/2020/10/04/patterning-fitted-garments/

Version: 2
date: 2/26/2021
Source of Period Pic:
Model:
Photographer: Vincent De Vere